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New pope elected from Argentina; takes name Pope Francis I

Published On: Mar 13 2013 01:38:08 PM CDT
Updated On: Mar 13 2013 04:26:23 PM CDT

AP

Jorge Mario Bergoglio has chosen the name Pope Francis I.

Cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio, S.J., Archbishop of Buenos Aires, Argentina has been elected the new pope.

He is from the Ordinary for Eastern-rite faithful in Argentina who lack an Ordinary of their own rite, was born on 17 December 1936 in Buenos Aires. He was ordained for the Jesuits on 13 December 1969 during his theological studies at the Theological Faculty of San Miguel.

He was novice master in San Miguel, where he also taught theology. He was Provincial for Argentina (1973-1979) and rector of the Philosophical and Theological Faculty of San Miguel (1980-1986). After completing his doctoral dissertation in Germany, he served as a confessor and spiritual director in Córdoba.

On 20 May 1992 he was appointed titular Bishop of Auca and Auxiliary of Buenos Aires, receiving episcopal consecration on 27 June. On 3 June 1997 was appointed Coadjutor Archbishop of Buenos Aires and succeeded Cardinal Antonio Quarracino on 28 February 1998. He is also Ordinary for Eastern-rite faithful in Argentina who lack an Ordinary of their own rite.

Adjunct Relator General of the 10th Ordinary General Assembly of the Synod of Bishops, October 2001.

He served as President of the Bishops' Conference of Argentina from 8 November 2005 until 8 November 2011.

Created and proclaimed Cardinal by the Bl. John Paul II in the consistory of 21 February 2001, of the  Title of S. Roberto Bellarmino (St. Robert Bellarmine).

Member of:

Congregations: for Divine Worship and Discipline of the Sacraments; for the Clergy; for  Institutes of Consecrated Life and Societies of Apostolic Life ;
Pontifical Council for the Family;
Pontifical Commission for Latin America.

The name and nationality of the pope has not been announced yet. Recent history: Pope John Paul II was chosen in three days and Pope Benedict XVI was chosen on the second day of conclave.

It was a fairly quick decision.

In centuries past, conclaves dragged on for weeks and months, sometimes years. During a 13th-century conclave that stretched for weeks, a leading candidate died.

These days the discussions are much quicker. The pope was chosen in five rounds over two days.

The previous conclave that chose Benedict XVI went four rounds over two days before the Latin announcement rang out across St. Peter's Square from the basilica's balcony: "Habemus papam" — We have a pope!

The longest conclave of the last century went on for 14 rounds over five days, and yielded Pius XI — in 1922.

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